Gait Sentinel Black Goalie Lacrosse Head | SportStop



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  • Shortened Comfort Grip Throat for improved control
  • Incredible Strength-to-Weight ratio
  • Multi-Hole stringing system
  • Designed to meet all rules and specifications

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Ratings & Reviews

5
4 stars
0% 0 reviews
3 stars
0% 0 reviews
2 stars
0% 0 reviews
1 star
0% 0 reviews
Based on 6 Reviews

Most Helpful Reviews

|

Intermediate Head

by From ORTING, WA
Great head for the price. It's an intermediate head that is shaped well and not too flexible.
Pros:
Price
Shape
Quality
Cons:
Put some for slots for mesh at the bottom of the head.

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|

Darn Good Head For Price

by From EVANSVILLE, IN
I've used this head for a few games and has worked amazing. I even scored a goal with it!
Pros:
Its really easy to string
Cons:
There are no bottom holes to do a bottom string.

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|

Gait Sentinel

by From RED HOOK NY
I prefer this head over my STX Eclipse. It is weighted very well, and has a large amount of sidewall holes so it is fairly easy to string it. There really is nothing wrong with this head, other than no bottom string holes which required a bit of experimenting to get the bottom string in through sidewall holes, but it worked out fine.
Pros:
Weight
Strength
Stringing holes
Looks pretty cool
Cons:
Add bottom string holes
More color options

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|

Awesome Goalie head, needs Mods

by From GLENDALE, CA
Lightweight Goalie Head that does the job, easy to create a unique stringing with excellent pocket depth and a nice channel for throwing.
Pros:
Light weight, great scoop, good goalie head shape, form fitting throat, great for stringing (except bottom)
Cons:
Needs more stringing holes in the bottom of the head, I drilled some in to accommodate my stringing, now I'm worried about cracks

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great head

by - verified purchaser From GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA
great head this head got me through my first season and I plan to keep using it.
Pros:
weight and strength
Cons:
not much

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Gait Sentinel Goalie Head

by - verified purchaser From BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
Gait is one of the best kept secrets out there in the lacrosse community. I am a lax coach and the father of 2 goalies, boy and girl. Our first encounter with Gait was with a pair of Gait “Mayhem” goalie gloves that were on clearance at a local Lax World store. I purchased them because I was initially impressed with the design…unlike the Brine goalie gloves that have what looks like a fortune cookie stitched to the top of the thumb, offering little to no added protection, or some of the Maverick and Warrior gloves that have in effect a small concrete bunker built around the thumb, guaranteeing that your thumbs will survive a nuclear attack but allowing for little to no movement, the Gait gloves appeared to have the perfect balance between added thumb protection and thumb movement. Again, bought the first pair based on how well they appeared to be designed…bought 2 more pairs (one for my daughter and a back-up pair for my son) based on the quality and durability of how well they were constructed and how well they functioned. This opened me up to looking into other Gait products. We used to be an STX Eclipse family, but I got tired of paying full retail for them and got tired of watching the idiots on ebay that got caught up in bidding wars that drove the price of used ones up to the price of new. Started looking into alternatives and decided to try the Sentinel after reading the reviews posted on retail sites and by bloggers. While weight may be a highly overrated issue when it comes to field positions, it is important in goal where every gram you can shave off contributes to quicker stick speed (even if that’s not true, if a goalie thinks something makes them faster, that’s good enough). To that end, the Sentinel, at 10.80 oz is lighter than the 11.35 oz Eclipse, but it doesn’t get there by skimping on the material it is constructed with or size…the Sentinel is actually stiffer than the eclipse, and when you hold the Sentinel and the Eclipse face to face, their footprint is almost identical. One of the biggest differences is in the neck (the part below the throat where the shaft slides into). The sentinel has a much smaller design with the end flared so as to allow the top hand to actually overlap the neck when holding it. This allows the hand to be closer to the sweet-spot and appears to provide for better control. I usually crisscross bootlaces down 4 or 5 inches from the top of the shaft and cover them with tape so as to give the top hand a better bite in order to minimize the spin from shots that hit off center (or worse, the rim of the sidewall)…with the Sentinel, that configuration can overlap the neck and ends up about an inch and a half higher on the shaft than with the Eclipse. This puts more of the shaft below the top hand, providing better balance which again provides better control. The only thing you have to watch out for is when stringing the pocket, while there are about a thousand holes along the top and sides, there are few holes at the bottom to terminate the 4 side wall strings and the heel string…the holes are there, you just don’t have as many as on the Eclipse. Once the Sentinel was strung and ready to go, I was getting in some practice reps with my son before a game so he could get a feel for the mechanics of the new head (and pocket). This was supposed to be one of several “break-in” sessions before making the transition from the Eclipse to the Sentinel in an actual game, but my son was so impressed with the way it functioned, he insisted on using it in that very game…there was no looking back from there, we now have three Sentinels. My daughter is still using the Eclipses, for now, but when the next one cracks, it will be replaced with a Sentinel. Bottom line, the Sentinel is a better quality, better performing head for almost half the cost of an Eclipse. Gait in general is one of the best values out there right now (although I may retract all of this if I don’t get my endorsement check in the mail).
Pros:
Crabs and Beer
Cons:
The weather in Baltimore

Was this review helpful?

Ratings & Reviews

5
4 stars
0% 0 reviews
3 stars
0% 0 reviews
2 stars
0% 0 reviews
1 star
0% 0 reviews
Based on 6 Reviews

Most Helpful Reviews

|

Intermediate Head

by From ORTING, WA
Great head for the price. It's an intermediate head that is shaped well and not too flexible.
Pros:
Price
Shape
Quality
Cons:
Put some for slots for mesh at the bottom of the head.

Was this review helpful?

|

Darn Good Head For Price

by From EVANSVILLE, IN
I've used this head for a few games and has worked amazing. I even scored a goal with it!
Pros:
Its really easy to string
Cons:
There are no bottom holes to do a bottom string.

Was this review helpful?

|

Gait Sentinel

by From RED HOOK NY
I prefer this head over my STX Eclipse. It is weighted very well, and has a large amount of sidewall holes so it is fairly easy to string it. There really is nothing wrong with this head, other than no bottom string holes which required a bit of experimenting to get the bottom string in through sidewall holes, but it worked out fine.
Pros:
Weight
Strength
Stringing holes
Looks pretty cool
Cons:
Add bottom string holes
More color options

Was this review helpful?

|

Awesome Goalie head, needs Mods

by From GLENDALE, CA
Lightweight Goalie Head that does the job, easy to create a unique stringing with excellent pocket depth and a nice channel for throwing.
Pros:
Light weight, great scoop, good goalie head shape, form fitting throat, great for stringing (except bottom)
Cons:
Needs more stringing holes in the bottom of the head, I drilled some in to accommodate my stringing, now I'm worried about cracks

Was this review helpful?

great head

by - verified purchaser From GASTONIA, NORTH CAROLINA
great head this head got me through my first season and I plan to keep using it.
Pros:
weight and strength
Cons:
not much

Was this review helpful?

Gait Sentinel Goalie Head

by - verified purchaser From BALTIMORE, MARYLAND
Gait is one of the best kept secrets out there in the lacrosse community. I am a lax coach and the father of 2 goalies, boy and girl. Our first encounter with Gait was with a pair of Gait “Mayhem” goalie gloves that were on clearance at a local Lax World store. I purchased them because I was initially impressed with the design…unlike the Brine goalie gloves that have what looks like a fortune cookie stitched to the top of the thumb, offering little to no added protection, or some of the Maverick and Warrior gloves that have in effect a small concrete bunker built around the thumb, guaranteeing that your thumbs will survive a nuclear attack but allowing for little to no movement, the Gait gloves appeared to have the perfect balance between added thumb protection and thumb movement. Again, bought the first pair based on how well they appeared to be designed…bought 2 more pairs (one for my daughter and a back-up pair for my son) based on the quality and durability of how well they were constructed and how well they functioned. This opened me up to looking into other Gait products. We used to be an STX Eclipse family, but I got tired of paying full retail for them and got tired of watching the idiots on ebay that got caught up in bidding wars that drove the price of used ones up to the price of new. Started looking into alternatives and decided to try the Sentinel after reading the reviews posted on retail sites and by bloggers. While weight may be a highly overrated issue when it comes to field positions, it is important in goal where every gram you can shave off contributes to quicker stick speed (even if that’s not true, if a goalie thinks something makes them faster, that’s good enough). To that end, the Sentinel, at 10.80 oz is lighter than the 11.35 oz Eclipse, but it doesn’t get there by skimping on the material it is constructed with or size…the Sentinel is actually stiffer than the eclipse, and when you hold the Sentinel and the Eclipse face to face, their footprint is almost identical. One of the biggest differences is in the neck (the part below the throat where the shaft slides into). The sentinel has a much smaller design with the end flared so as to allow the top hand to actually overlap the neck when holding it. This allows the hand to be closer to the sweet-spot and appears to provide for better control. I usually crisscross bootlaces down 4 or 5 inches from the top of the shaft and cover them with tape so as to give the top hand a better bite in order to minimize the spin from shots that hit off center (or worse, the rim of the sidewall)…with the Sentinel, that configuration can overlap the neck and ends up about an inch and a half higher on the shaft than with the Eclipse. This puts more of the shaft below the top hand, providing better balance which again provides better control. The only thing you have to watch out for is when stringing the pocket, while there are about a thousand holes along the top and sides, there are few holes at the bottom to terminate the 4 side wall strings and the heel string…the holes are there, you just don’t have as many as on the Eclipse. Once the Sentinel was strung and ready to go, I was getting in some practice reps with my son before a game so he could get a feel for the mechanics of the new head (and pocket). This was supposed to be one of several “break-in” sessions before making the transition from the Eclipse to the Sentinel in an actual game, but my son was so impressed with the way it functioned, he insisted on using it in that very game…there was no looking back from there, we now have three Sentinels. My daughter is still using the Eclipses, for now, but when the next one cracks, it will be replaced with a Sentinel. Bottom line, the Sentinel is a better quality, better performing head for almost half the cost of an Eclipse. Gait in general is one of the best values out there right now (although I may retract all of this if I don’t get my endorsement check in the mail).
Pros:
Crabs and Beer
Cons:
The weather in Baltimore

Was this review helpful?